Vortex Toldeo : fragments and foreshadowings of a cosmopolitan world
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navigation, contact, access: click ►▼, link & ••• — February 2, 2017
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how to contact us
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Leif Smith
303-778-0880
Explorers Foundation, Inc.
PO Box 9100
Denver, CO 80209
USA
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leifsmith@gmail.comImportant: If we are not already in email communication, please put “*****” at the beginning of the Subject: line of your email. This will assure that we don’t miss the first email you send to us.
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Explorers Foundation ••• home page
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efBegin ••• top level for all outlines
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Vortices ••• - a list, with explanations
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Threads •••, traces of conversations
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Glyphs ••• (a list of fragments of Freeorder)
 
explorersfoundation.org/toledo.html — a vortex is a region of Explorers Foundation research and investment.
 
Vortex Toldeo is devoted to the story of places in the world where people of many beliefs, from many cultures, could converse and weave a collaborative path to new knowledge and industry. Often such places are identified by following the flight paths as explorers of all kinds in their flight from tyrants. What would a dynamic mapping through time of such flights look like in a graphical simulation? Each major cultural stream might be designated by a color, and the hues found mingling in the shared havens would be combined in fascinating ways.
 
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Books, Tools, Resources
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Sea of Faith, by O'Shea — Toledo, times of convivencia, Spain, Sicily
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This book, containing the story of Toledo, Spain, provided the name for this vortex.
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The Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain, by María Rosa Menocal — recommended by Imad-ad-Dean Ahmad, of the Minaret of Freedom
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Strangers Nowhere in the World, by Margaret C. Jacob
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Cosmopolitanism, by Kwame Anthony Appiah
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A wonderful description of the author's cosmopolitan birthplace, Kumsai, in Ghana's Asante region, in the 1950s, pg. xix
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Daniel Deronda, by George Eliot, 1876 - Project Gutenberg: download the book. Historian Paul Johnson has written that this was one of the most influential books of the 19th century.
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Leo Africanus, by Amin Maalouf — a story of a cosmopolitan North African
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The Walking Drum, Louis L'Amour — Cordoba, Spain, during the time of the Umayyads
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Arab/American: Landscape, Culture, and Cuisine in Two Great Deserts, Gary Paul Nabhan
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"If, after reading this book, you occasionally see plants, irrigation canals, or Arabian horses differently, hear echoes of Arabic chants in music from the desert borderlands, or recognize the taste of certain Middle Eastern spices in your southwestern cuisine, I will be gratified that your own synaesthetic shift has begun. I will feel that my mission has been accomplished when and if Arabians and Americans fully appreciate their gifts to one another, as if they were brought together by a magi from a distant land." —Gary Paul Nabhan
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Arab/American Landscape, Culture, and Cuisine in Two Great Deserts, Gary Paul Nabhan 160 pp. / 6.0 x 9.0 / 2008 Cloth (978-0-8165-2658-1) [s] Paper (978-0-8165-2659-8)
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Islam and the Discovery of Freedom, Rose Wilder Lane, edited by Imad-ad-Dean Ahmad
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Richard Francis Burton, born 1821, a study in cosmopolitanism, pg. 1 <of what book, leif? if anyone guesses why I put this note here, reminding me would be helpful :-)>
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City names suggestive of this vortex: Toledo, Constantinople, Istanbul, Amsterdam, Palermo, Alexandria, Shanghai, Rome, London, Paris, New York, Prague, Beirut, Baghdad, Cairo. Each is an outstanding example of cosmopolitan during a certain period of its history. The the flights of refugee thinkers, artists, scientists, lead to luminous eras for each of these cities.
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Cosmopolitan Cities (dates C.E.)
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Alexandria
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Rome
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Bagdhad
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Cordoba (10th Century)
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Toledo
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Palermo — 12th Century C.E.
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"Institutionally, the Normans combined the administrative machinery of the Byzantines, Arabs, and Lombards with their own conceptions of feudal law and order to forge a completely unique government. Under this state, there was great religious freedom, and alongside the Norman nobles existed a meritocratic bureaucracy of Jews, Muslims, and Christians, both Catholic and Orthodox." —Wikipedia, "Normans", 12Mar08
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Amsterdam
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Hanseatic League - see vortex Openworld
 
.oOo.